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Bell Pepper Diseases and Problems

bell-pepper-diseases

Alternaria Leaf Spot/Early Blight

Characteristics: Sunken lesions will appear on weakened spots of fruit such as cracks.  The spores become evident as the spots grow and take on a gray moldy appearance.

Plant leaves develop dark circles that have lighter centers with dark ridges as they expand.

Cause: Fungal pathogen caused by Alternaria.

Management: Fungus spores live in infected plant debris.  Clear all garden debris at the end of the season and til the soil prior to planting in the spring.

Fungus spores are carried through wind and water droplets.  Good irrigation practices that include drip irrigation to the soil, rather than spraying droplets on plants will help to manage its spread.  Do not work in the garden when it is wet to discourage spread through human contact.

Alternaria attacks weakened plants.  Keep plants vigorous through proper irrigation, fertilization, and management of pests.  It often attacks fruits experiencing a calcium deficiency.

Commercial fungicides are available to help manage Alternaria.

Anthracnose

Characteristics: Black sunken lesions will appear on the skin of the fruit.  The spores become evident as the spots grow and take on an orange moldy appearance with black spines.

Plant leaves may develop dark circles that have lighter centers with dark ridges as they expand.

Cause: Fungal pathogen caused by Colletotrichum.

Management: Colletotrichum are often introduced to the garden through infected seed and transplants.  Purchase only disease free seed from a reputable source.  Purchase resistant plant varieties.

Fungus spores live in infected plant debris.  Clear all garden debris at the end of the season and til the soil prior to planting in the spring.

Fungus spores are carried through wind and water droplets.  Good irrigation practices that include drip irrigation to the soil, rather than spraying droplets on plants will help to manage its spread.  Do not work in the garden when it is wet to discourage spread through human contact.

Colletotrichum attacks weakened plants.  Keep plants vigorous through proper irrigation, fertilization, and management of pests.

Commercial fungicides are available to help manage Alternaria.

Phytophthora Blight

Characteristics: Small dark green spots will appear on infected plant leaves causing them to wilt.

If the pathogen infects the stems first, lesions may appear and cause the stem to discolor internally and collapse.  If the fungus spreads to the top of the plant before stem collapse occurs, the leaves may suddenly wilt and plant death may occur.

Infected fruit will develop water soaked patches.  The pathogen becomes evident as the patches begin to develop a white, moldy appearance.

Cause: Fungal pathogen caused by Phytophthora capsici.

Management: Fungus spores live in infected plant debris.  Clear all garden debris at the end of the season and til the soil prior to planting in the spring.

Fungus spores are carried through wind and water droplets.  Good irrigation practices that include drip irrigation to the soil, rather than spraying droplets on plants will help to manage its spread.  Do not work in the garden when it is wet to discourage spread through human contact.

Phytophthora capsici attacks weakened plants.  Keep plants vigorous through proper irrigation, fertilization, and management of pests.  It often attacks fruits experiencing a calcium deficiency.

Commercial fungicides are available to help manage Phytophthora capsici.

Verticillium Wilt

Characteristics: Leaves begin to yellow and curl inward ultimately resulting in drop.  As the fungus spreads, the leaves may begin to crinkle and brown.  Fruits may begin to shrivel.  When it spreads to the roots, it causes browning and rotting of the root.

Cause: Fungal pathogen caused by Verticillium albo-atrum and Verticillium dahlia.

Management: Strains of this fungus are difficult to manage and can live for years in the soil.  If plant death has occurred, pull up all roots and destroy plants.

Fungus spores are carried through wind and water droplets.  Good irrigation practices that include drip irrigation to the soil, rather than spraying droplets on plants will help to manage its spread.  Do not work in the garden when it is wet to discourage spread through human contact.

Verticillium albo-atrum and Verticillium dahlia attack plants with root stress.  Keep plants vigorous through proper irrigation, fertilization, and management of pests.

 

Resources

“Alternaria Fruit Rot of Pepper.” Texas A&M Agrilife Extension. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Mar. 2014. <http://amarillo.tamu.edu/files/2010/11/AlternariaPepper2011.pdf>.

“Anthracnose Fruit Rot of Pepper.” Ohio State University Extension Fact Sheet. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Mar. 2014. <http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/3000/3307.html>.

“Anthracnose on Pepper in Florida1.” EDIS New Publications RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Mar. 2014. <http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp104>.

“Bacteria.” Pepper Disease Control. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Mar. 2014. <http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/NewsArticles/PepDisease_Con.htm>.

“Bell Pepper.” Texas A&M Agrilife Extension. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Mar. 2014. <http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/vegetable/files/2011/10/pepper-Bell.pdf>.

“Early Blight or Alternaria Leaf Spot (Alternaria spp.)-Hort Answers -.” University of Illinois Extension. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Mar. 2014. <http://urbanext.illinois.edu/hortanswers/detailProblem.cfm?PathogenID=127>.

“Pepper: Phytophthora Blight.” NCSU Factsheet. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Mar. 2014. <http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/plantpath/extension/fact_sheets/Pepper_-_Phytophthora_blight.htm>.

“Peppers: Verticillium Wilt.” University of California Agriculture & Natural Resources. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Mar. 2014. <http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r604100411.html>.

“Phytophthora Blight of Pepper & Other Vegetables.” Cornell University Vegetable MD Online. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Mar. 2014. <http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/factsheets/Cucurbit_Phytoph.htm>.

“University of Illinois Extension-Urban Programs Resource Network.” Verticillium Wilt. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Mar. 2014. <http://urbanext.illinois.edu/focus/?problem=verticillium-wilt>.

 

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