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Can Vinegar Get Rid of Warts?

can-vinegar-remove-warts

ANSWER:

There is no clinical evidence that vinegar can remove warts. 

More Info: Though vinegar has not been studied as a topical treatment for diminishing the appearance of warts, people have applied this folk remedy for years.  Many sing its praises, but also complain that this method of removal is quite painful.

Naturalists Promote Vinegar

Researchers may not be joining the cause to add vinegar to the list of effective wart removal remedies, but other professionals are.  A bulletin released by the University of Florida IFAS Extension, jam-packed with useful information on opting to use natural ingredients over those more toxic, included a wart removal recipe that contained apple cider vinegar.  According to the extension, mix one part apple cider vinegar to one part glycerin to create a lotion.  Apply this to the infected area once per day until the warts dissolve.

Vinegar Skin Warnings

Natural home remedies aren’t without their own risk.  Just because something is natural doesn’t make it safe for everyone.  It should be noted that vinegar, or acetic acid, is a known skin irritant.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention acetic acid is a severe irritant to the eyes, mucous membranes, and the skin.

Medically Approved Uses for Vinegar and Warts

Because there is no approved test to find genital warts, a doctor may use a vinegar solution to find warts.  The premise of the test is that vinegar applied to any skin lesion will turn the area white. The results of this procedure are highly ineffective at determining if an individual has genital warts, but it is useful in highlighting skin lesions that are not visible to the naked eye.

 

Resources

“STD Facts – Human papillomavirus (HPV).” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Oct. 2010. http://www.cdc.gov/STD/HPV/STDFact-HPV.htm.

“Georgia Health Info | Genital warts.” Georgia Health Info. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Oct. 2010. http://georgiahealthinfo.gov/cms/node/141623.

“Hurrican Recovery Cleaning up the Mess.” University of Florida IFAS Extension. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Oct. 2010. <martin.ifas.ufl.edu/docs/FCS/CleanMess.pdf>.

“Occupational Health Guideline for Acetic Acid.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. N.p., n.d. Web. 25

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