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Does A Glycolic Peel Work For Acne?

does-a-glycolic-peel-work-for-acne

ANSWER:

Yes, glycolic acid chemical peels are effective in treating all kinds of acne[1].

According to a study performed at the Cagliari University Dermatology Department in Italy, eighty patients afflicted with acne, aged thirteen to forty years old, were given glycolic acid chemical peel treatments with a seventy percent strength[2]. The results of the study show that all kinds of acne, particularly papulo-postular acne, comedogenic acne and nodular-cystic acne rapidly disappeared or were diminished after the treatment period.

Apart from treating acne, glycolic acid chemical peels have been proven to be effective for skin that has experienced mild sun damage, minimal aging and skin discolorations[3].

The Glycolic Peel Procedure

One of the key features of the glycolic peel procedure is that it is a relatively quick procedure. It can be accomplished within thirty minutes to one hour. In fact, your glycolic peel procedure can even be performed during your lunch break, hence its nickname, “the lunchtime peel”[4].

The glycolic peel procedure is not only quick, but it is simple too. A glycolic peel solution with a strength varying from forty to seventy percent is applied on the face with a brush[5]. In order for the treatment to be effective for acne however, a strength of seventy percent glycolic acid is required[6]. Once the skin becomes a light pinking color, the glycolic acid solution must be neutralized using water, which is usually sprayed on the face of the patient.

Keep in mind that although glycolic peels are now widely available in salons and spas, it is still better to seek the advise of a medical professional such as a dermatologist or dermatologic surgeon, especially if you have sensitive skin, have taken isotretinoin medications during the last six months, or have already undergone cosmetic procedures[7].

 

Resources

[1]Atzori, L., P. Biggio, A. Orr, and M.A. Brundu. “Glycolic Acid Peeling In The Treatment of Acne.” Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 12.2 (2006). Wiley Online Library. Web. 06 June 2011. <http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-3083.1999.tb01000.x/abstract>.

[2] Atzori, L., P. Biggio, A. Orr, and M.A. Brundu. “Glycolic Acid Peeling In The Treatment of Acne.” Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 12.2 (2006). Wiley Online Library. Web. 06 June 2011. <http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-3083.1999.tb01000.x/abstract>.

[3]“Chemical Peeling.” SkinCarePhysicians.com. The American Academy of Dermatology. Web. 06 June 2011. <http://www.skincarephysicians.com/agingskinnet/chemical_peeling.html>.

[4]“Chemical Peeling.” SkinCarePhysicians.com. The American Academy of Dermatology. Web. 06 June 2011. <http://www.skincarephysicians.com/agingskinnet/chemical_peeling.html>.

[5] Deitz, Sallie S. The Clinical Aesthetician: An Insiders Guide To Succeeding In A Medical Office. New York: Delmar/Thompson, 2003. Print.

[6]Atzori, L., P. Biggio, A. Orr, and M.A. Brundu. “Glycolic Acid Peeling In The Treatment of Acne.” Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 12.2 (2006). Wiley Online Library. Web. 06 June 2011. <http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-3083.1999.tb01000.x/abstract>.

[7]“Chemical Peeling.” SkinCarePhysicians.com. The American Academy of Dermatology. Web. 06 June 2011. <http://www.skincarephysicians.com/agingskinnet/chemical_peeling.html>.

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