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Does Carbonated Water Cause Weight Gain?


 

Important!

Answer:

Carbonated water, in its purest form, does not cause weight gain.

 


 

More Info: The only instance that carbonated water may influence weight gain is in the presence of additives such as sugar, artificial sweeteners, sodium, or additional calories.

does-carbonated-water-cause-weight-gain

 

What Is Carbonated Water?

Carbonated water is merely water that has carbon gases added to it. This gas is present in the form of carbonic acid, which may cause some people to drink it to feel fuller and more satisfied.  If that is the case, it can possibly assist with weight loss efforts.

Carbonated water may come in the form or pure or mineral water. Mineral water is simply pure water with added minerals that are beneficial to your health. The human body needs plenty of water in order to function properly. The amount of water needed each day varies from person to person, depending on factors such as size, medical conditions, age, amount of exercise, and the climate where you live.  As an example if you exercise consistently, live in a hotter or dryer climate, are pregnant or breastfeeding, or if you are sick, you should consume additional amounts of water each day.

For some, the idea of drinking so much water is not appealing. Carbonated water offers variety, and as long as no sugar or other ingredients have been added, contains no calories to contribute to weight gain. Drinking carbonated water throughout the day, including before and after meals, may help you to feel fuller, take the edge off hunger, and consume fewer calories.

Resources

 

“Carbon Dioxide – Carbonic Acid Equilibrium.” Utah State University Chemistry & Biology. Utah State University, n.d. Web. 3 June 2010. <www.chem.usu.edu/~sbialkow/Classes/3600/Overheads/Carbonate

 

“Drink to Your Health.” UCLA Dining Services. UCLA, n.d. Web. 4 June 2010. www.dining.ucla.edu/housing_site/dining/SNAC_pdf/DrinkToYourHealth.pdf

 

4, Jeffree Itrich | December, and  2006. “Avoiding the Annual Holiday Gain.” UC SAN DIEGO NEWS CENTER. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 June 2010. http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/thisweek/2006/dec/12_04_weight.asp.

 

“UMIM: Healing Foods Pyramid – Water | University of Michigan Health System.” University of Michigan Health System. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 June 2010. http://www.med.umich.edu/umim/food-pyramid/water.htm.