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How Fractional Co2 Laser Resurfacing Works

how-fractional-co2-resurfacing-works

Carbon dioxide or CO2 laser resurfacing is a type of laser resurfacing treatment that is used to treat skin that is suffering from signs of aging and sun damage, as well as marks and other imperfections[1].

Laser Resurfacing

Laser resurfacing procedures involve the use of laser technology in vaporizing or ablating the  particular layer or layers of blemished skin that you desire to have removed, in order that a new layer of skin will be revealed in its place[2]. Laser resurfacing treatments in general remove the skin’s layers in a very precise and targeted manner. This characteristic makes the procedure much safer as there is less risk of scarring and it also allows for faster skin recovery time.

CO2 Laser Resurfacing

The carbon dioxide laser resurfacing procedure employs the use of carbon dioxide lasers that are delivered in short-pulsed yet high-energy bursts that vaporize the blemished skin[3]. The wavelength emitted by carbon dioxide laser light is 10,600 nm[4].

CO2 laser resurfacing is particularly recommended for the treatment of skin that has wrinkles, scars, warts, birthmarks, enlarged pores, and even skin that is afflicted with skin cancer lesions. What differentiates carbon dioxide laser resurfacing from other types of laser resurfacing procedures is that here, the lasers remove the skin one later at the time, in a very precise manner. There is very minimal heat damage that is created in the skin, thus allowing your skin to recover faster[5]. The average recovery time for skin that is treated by carbon dioxide laser resurfacing is seven to fourteen days.

Kinds of CO2 Laser Resurfacing

There are two kinds of carbon dioxide laser resurfacing treatments that are used in skin resurfacing. The first is the high-power pulsed carbon dioxide laser and the second is the optomechanical flash scanner laser[6].

 

 Resources

[1]Wheatley, MD, Michael J. “Laser Skin Resurfacing Types, Conditions It Treats, Complications, and More.” WebMD – Better Information. Better Health. 2 Feb. 2010. Web. 04 Aug. 2011. <http://www.webmd.com/healthy-beauty/guide/laser-resurfacing>.

[2]“Laser Resurfacing Information.” ASDS – American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. Web. 04 Aug. 2011. <http://www.asds.net/LaserResurfacingInformation.aspx>.

[3]Jacono, MD Chief, Andrew. “Carbon Dioxide Laser Skin Resurfacing.” Medscape Reference. WebMD. Web. 5 Aug. 2011. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1296806-overview#a05>.

[4]“Laser Resurfacing Information.” ASDS – American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. Web. 04 Aug. 2011. <http://www.asds.net/LaserResurfacingInformation.aspx>.

[5]“Laser Resurfacing Information.” ASDS – American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. Web. 04 Aug. 2011. <http://www.asds.net/LaserResurfacingInformation.aspx>.

[6]“Laser Resurfacing Information.” ASDS – American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. Web. 04 Aug. 2011. <http://www.asds.net/LaserResurfacingInformation.aspx>.

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