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Is A Glycolic Peel Safe During Pregnancy?

is-a-glycolic-peel-safe-during-pregnancy

There are conflicting views with regard to the safety of the use of glycolic peels on pregnant patients.

According to Dr. Leslie Baumann, a professor of dermatology at the University of Miami, glycolic peels are safe for pregnant women[1].  Some chemical peels however contain a combination of glycolic acid and other acids that are proven to be harmful for pregnant and lactating patients, such as salicylic acid[2]. It is thus essential for you to clarify the exact ingredients of the glycolic peel procedure you are planning to undertake, with your dermatologist.

The general view however is that glycolic peels should be avoided during pregnancy and lactation[3].

Glycolic Peel Treatments

Glycolic peels are performed on patients who are in need of superficial exfoliation of the skin[4]. It is used primarily to treat skin that is suffering from mild aging, mild sun damage, acne and acne spots[5].

During the procedure, a glycolic peel solution that is forty to seventy percent in strength is applied on your face using a brush. The attending nurse or doctor will wait until your face or the skin turns a slight pinkish color before neutralizing it with water[6].  It is very important to remove the peel before the skin turns white as this is an indication that the glycolic peel is working on deeper areas of the skin.

The recommended number of sessions for glycolic peel treatments vary between patients, but the average number of sessions is usually six peels with two to four week intervals between each peel[7].  Maintenance sessions after the treatment period are also required in order to maximize the benefits of your glycolic peels.

In order to ensure you and your baby’s maximum safety, it is best to consult with a certified dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon before undergoing a glycolic peel treatment during and after your pregnancy[8].

 

Resources

[1] KL. “Beautiful For You, Safe For Your Baby.” Working Mother Dec. 2007: 80. Google Books. Web. 06 June 2011. <http://books.google.com/books?id=dPmeZapAQqQC>.

[2]KL. “Beautiful For You, Safe For Your Baby.” Working Mother Dec. 2007: 80. Google Books. Web. 06 June 2011. <http://books.google.com/books?id=dPmeZapAQqQC>.

[3]“Glycolic Acid Peels.” Johns Hopkins Center for Clinical Global Health Education. Web. 06 June 2011. <http://www.ccghe.jhmi.edu/COS/Patient/Procuedures/glycolic.asp>.

[4] Deitz, Sallie S. The Clinical Aesthetician: An Insiders Guide To Succeeding In A Medical Office. New York: Delmar/Thompson, 2003. Print.

[5]“Glycolic Acid Peels.” Johns Hopkins Center for Clinical Global Health Education. Web. 06 June 2011. <http://www.ccghe.jhmi.edu/COS/Patient/Procuedures/glycolic.asp>.

[6] Deitz, Sallie S. The Clinical Aesthetician: An Insiders Guide To Succeeding In A Medical Office. New York: Delmar/Thompson, 2003. Print.

[7]“Glycolic Acid Peels.” Johns Hopkins Center for Clinical Global Health Education. Web. 06 June 2011. <http://www.ccghe.jhmi.edu/COS/Patient/Procuedures/glycolic.asp>.

[8]“Chemical Peeling.” SkinCarePhysicians.com. The American Academy of Dermatology. Web. 06 June 2011. <http://www.skincarephysicians.com/agingskinnet/chemical_peeling.html>.

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