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Is Red Wine Good for High Blood Pressure?

Is Red Wine Good for High Blood Pressure?

Answer: Red wine is NOT good for high blood pressure.

Red wine is NOT good for high blood pressure.

More Info: One study suggests that red wine may increase blood pressure.

Studies abound on the health benefits of red wine, most of which indicate that red wine may have antioxidant properties that can help to protect against heart disease by increasing levels of good cholesterol.  It has also been suggested that a component of wine called resveratrol helps to prevent damage to blood vessels and prevent blood clots. [“Red wine, antioxidants and resveratrol: Good for your heart?” mayoclinic.com] With the good comes the bad. A new study has emerged that red wine may have deleterious health effects where high blood pressure is concerned.

Red Wine Could Increase Risk of High Blood Pressure

According to a study published in the American Journal of Physiology, Heart and Circulatory Physiology drinking a few glasses of red wine can increase your risk of high blood pressure.

In the study, healthy, non-smokers were monitored following one glass of red wine.  The researchers found that it had a slight beneficial effect of dilating the blood vessels, causing the heart to exert less effort.  The second drink had the opposite effect, increasing the heart rate and lowering the ability of the blood vessels to expand, causing the heart to work harder. The study concluded that frequent drinking could increase the risk of heart attack or high blood pressure.

The study also tested the immediate effects of one drink and did not analyze the impact of long-term drinking, which carries with its risks.

 

REFERENCES:

“Red wine, antioxidants and resveratrol: Good for your heart? – MayoClinic.com.” Mayo Clinic. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Apr. 2012. <http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/red-wine/HB00089>.

Spaak, Jonas, and et al. “Dose-related effects of red wine and alcohol on hemodynamics, sympathetic nerve activity, and arterial diameter .” American Journal of Physiology, Heart and Circulatory Physiology 294.2 (2008): 605-612. Print.

 

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