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Retroachilles Bursitis Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment

Retroachilles Bursitis Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment

 

Retroachilles bursitis is a particular type of foot condition that is located in the heel between the skin and the Achilles’ tendon. This is where the retroachilles bursa can be found. The bursa in the heel releases and absorbs fluid, acting as a natural cushion for the foot during movement. When the bursa is hurt, it will become filled with excess fluid, resulting in retroachilles bursitis. People who are usually affected by this condition are middle-aged or older. While some people can suffer from retroachilles bursitis and only experience a limited amount of discomfort, others suffer greatly from the pain that it can cause.

Symptoms

Someone suffering from retroachilles bursitis may experience pain, swelling, and tenderness in their heel. Redness can also sometimes be seen around the area. The severity of symptoms is unique to each individual, but a doctor should be consulted even if you are feeling only a slight discomfort in your foot to prevent further injury and pain.

Causes

Shoes are often the culprit behind retroachilles bursitis. Footwear that rub against your foot uncomfortably, are not the correct size, or have a particularly hard heel can create foot problems that lead to retroachilles bursitis or any number of foot conditions. Frequently wearing high-heeled shoes can also cause retroachilles bursitis, giving it the nickname “pump bump bursitis.” People who overuse certain areas of the body through sports, exercise routines, or work on the job can easily cause injury to their foot. Less frequently retroachilles bursitis can occur because of an infection in the bursa. Retroachilles bursitis can also be an affect of an already exiting arthritic condition.

Treatment

Most people will be advised to change the shoes that they wear to ones that don’t rub on the heel, provide comfort and support, and are a proper fit. Many will be required to rest the foot and stop performing any strenuous activities that would cause further pain or inflammation. Mild cases may be given a simple anti-inflammatory drug and ice packs to help ease the swelling of the bursa. Some people may receive a steroid injection for an immediate reduction in swelling and pain. Only in extreme instances is the bursa surgically removed from the heel when all other options have been exhausted

 

REFERENCES:

Aldridge M.D., Tracy. “Diagnosing Heel Pain in Adults.” Southern Illinois University School of Medicine. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Jan. 2011. <www1.cleveland.edu/uploads/ramcharan/ged734/Diagnosing%20Heel%20Pain%20in%20Adults.pdf>.

“Arthritis Disease Center l Disease Definitions l Arthritis Disease and Related Conditions.” Arthritis Foundation | Symptoms Treatments | Prevention Tips | Pain Relief Advice. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Jan. 2011. http://www.arthritis.org/disease-center.php?disease_id=6&df=definition.

“Arthritis Disease Center l Disease Definitions l Arthritis Disease and Related Conditions.” Arthritis Foundation | Symptoms Treatments | Prevention Tips | Pain Relief Advice. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Jan. 2011. http://www.arthritis.org/disease-center.php?df=effects&disease_id=6.

“Arthritis Disease Center l Disease Definitions l Arthritis Disease and Related Conditions.” Arthritis Foundation | Symptoms Treatments | Prevention Tips | Pain Relief Advice. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Jan. 2011. http://www.arthritis.org/disease-center.php?disease_id=6&df=treatments.

 

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