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Where is Rose Quartz Found?

where-is-rose-quartz-found



ANSWER:

Rose quartz can be found in Africa, Australia, Canada, England, Germany, India, Brazil, Madagascar, Scotland, and the United States.

More Info: Rose quartz crystals were first found near Rumford, Maine in the United States. Today, however, the majority of the world’s supply of rose quartz is mined in Brazil. Unlike the majority of quartz varieties that are found, rose quartz forms in solid stone like masses and not normally in a crystal form. This fact has scientists and mineralogists confused as to their strange formation. Rose quartz is a silicon dioxide and a macrochrystalline variety within the quartz family. The stones get their milky pinkish color as a result of microscopic mineral fibers such as aluminum and phosphorous impurities that can be found within the gemstone. Stones that are clear enough to use as gemstones are a rarity to find. In fact, when they were first discovered, rose quartz crystals where considered to be fake gemstones by mineralogists from all over the world.

Used mainly as gemstones, rose quartz crystals are also used as a raw chemical ingredient when manufacturing abrasives, cements, porcelain, glass, concrete, and other industrial type materials. Some people even believe that these beautiful gemstones can help balance emotions, to give the body an inner peace and harmony. Physically people also have the belief that rose quartz can assist with weight loss issues and aid in the proper functioning of vital organs, such as kidneys, liver, lungs and heart just to name a few.

 

Resources

“Rose Quartz.” Welcome to Volcano World! | Volcano World | Oregon State University. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 June 2010. http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/vwdocs/vwlessons/lessons/Slideshow/Show2/Show2-8.html.

“Colored Varieties of Quartz.” Mineral Spectroscopy. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 June 2010. http://minerals.caltech.edu/ge114/Lecture_Topics/Quartz/Index.htm.

“Rose Quartz.” Northern State University::Â Aberdeen, SD. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 June 2010. http://www3.northern.edu/natsource/EARTH/Rosequ1.htm.