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Who Gets Kidney Stones?

Who Gets Kidney Stones?

Kidney stones, one of the most common disorders of the urinary tract, are responsible for more than three million visits to health care professionals every year and will affect more than 5% of the population.  Kidney stones, the pain of which is often referred to as comparable to that of giving birth, strike both men and women, but men are more likely to get them.  Who gets kidney stones depends largely upon lifestyle habits and risk factors. [“Kidney Stones in Adults ” National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse]

Population Risk for Kidney Stones

Caucasian males between the ages of 40-70 are the highest risk group for developing kidney stones.  Women are at a greater risk over the age of 50. Risk increases with age for both men and women.   Being overweight also increases the risk of developing kidney stones.  Premature infants will often develop kidney stones. [“Kidney Stones in Adults ” National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse]

Lifestyle Habits Increase Risk of Kidney Stones

Those at the greatest risk of developing kidney stones are those that do not drink enough fluids.  You are most likely to get kidney stones if you produce less than one quart of urine per day. Those that are prone to kidney stones should attempt to produce at least two quarts of urine a day through the fluid intake.  An additional risk factor is consuming a diet high in animal proteins such as meat and eggs [“Kidney stones .” National Center for Biotechnology Information]

Family History Plays a Role in Kidney Stone Risk

If someone in your family has had kidney stones, you are at a greater risk of developing them.  You are also more likely to develop subsequent kidney stones once you have already had them.  A hereditary condition, known as hypercalciuria, may be responsible for more than half of the cases of the kidney of stones. [“Kidney Stones in Adults ” National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse]

Medical Conditions Cause Kidney Stones

Several medical conditions increase your chance of developing kidney stones such as urinary tract and kidney infections.  Additional conditions that increase the risk of developing kidney stones are gout, vitamin D toxicity,    [Kidney Stones ” American Kidney Fund]

Rare disorders cause kidney stones including renal tubular acidosis, cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, hyperuricosuria, and hyperparathyroidism. [“Kidney Stones in Adults ” National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse]

 

Resources:

[1]”Kidney Stones in Adults ” National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 May 2012. http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/stonesadults/

[2]”Kidney Stones ” American Kidney Fund (AKF) – Reaching Out, Giving Hope, Improving Lives. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 May 2012. <http://www.kidneyfund.org/kidney-health/kidney-problems/kidney-stones.html>.

[3]”Kidney stones ” National Center for Biotechnology Information. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 May 2012. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001493/>

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